THE new trailer of an upcoming film titled Cocaine Bear has left fans anxious for its release as it shows the coked-up beast on a vicious killing spree.

The wild film is based on the true story of a bear who ate a duffel bag full of 75lb of cocaine that fell from a plane in a forest in Georgia, US.

Universal Pictures

The trailer of the much-anticipated film was released yesterday[/caption]

Universal Pictures

Cocaine Bear is due to be released on February 2023[/caption]

Universal Pictures

It is loosely based on the true story of a black bear that overdosed on cocaine in Georgia in 1985[/caption]

Universal Pictures

In the film, the bear goes on a wild rampage after ingesting packets of the powder[/caption]

The discovery of the overdosed bear was linked to the case of an ex-narcotics cop turned drug smuggler who fell from a plane strapped up with £12m of the powder.

The bizarre story became the inspiration horror comedy film titled Cocaine Bear which is due to be released in February 2023.

The first trailer for the bonkers horror comedy with the drug-fuelled animal on a rampage has left movie fans eagerly waiting to hit the big screen.

After watching the trailer, fans took it to Twitter with one branding it “the greatest movie ever made.”

Someone wrote: “It’s the duty of every film lover to make Cocaine Bear a box office success.

One added: “I am already obsessed with Cocaine Bear. Apex predator, off his face? Overconfident, sped up, angry, agitated?

“That ten minutes before his heart exploded and he dropped dead must’ve been be a wild ride.

A Twitter user wrote: “Cocaine Bear is gonna be one of the greatest films of all time I can already feel myself becoming obsessed with it.

Someone else said: “I’m so unironically amped for this movie it’s insane. The Cocaine Bear is the greatest thing to ever happen in history.”

The much-anticipated film, directed by Elizabeth Banks is meant to be the last movie of Goodfellas star, Ray Liotta who died in his sleep earlier this year.

It details the story of the overdosed bear that was found in the middle of the Chattahoochee National Forest in 1985 after ingesting millions of pounds worth of cocaine.

“Its stomach was literally packed to the brim with cocaine,” the medical examiner who looked at the bear told the owners of Kentucky for Kentucky, a shop which promotes the state.

“There isn’t a mammal on the planet that could survive that.

“Cerebral haemorrhaging, respiratory failure, hyperthermia, renal failure, heart failure, stroke. You name it, that bear had it.”

The discovery of the bear was linked to the mystery case of ex-cop Andrew Thornton II who was found dead on a driveway in Tennessee with a failed parachute on his back.

The 40-year-old was carrying thousands in cash and two pistols, and was wearing night vision goggles, a bulletproof vest, and Gucci loafers on his feet.

Flying from Colombia, the drug smuggler was dropping packages of cocaine from the plane over Georgia – one of which the bear found.

He then jumped himself with the rest strapped to his waist – the abandoned aircraft was left on autopilot and it smashed into a mountainside in North Carolina.

According to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, Thornton “hit his head on the tail of the aircraft” as he jumped and failed to open his parachute as he plunged to the ground.

Cops thought he was planning to meet someone when he landed, and investigators retracing his plane’s flightpath eventually found nine duffel bags of cocaine.

Three months after Thornton’s fall, the black bear that did find the tenth duffel bag was discovered dead in the forest.

The medical examiner gave the carcass to a taxidermist friend who stuffed the bear, and it went on display at a visitor centre in the forest.

When a wildfire swept through the forest in the 90s, employees at the centre saved the bear and some of their other treasures from the flames by putting them in storage.

But it was stolen and sold to a pawn shop – which in turn sold it to country music legend Waylon Jennings.

He gave it to a friend and, when the friend died, it was bought for $200 at an auction of his estate.

The buyer, Zhu T’ang, ran a Chinese medicine shop in Reno, Nevada, where the bear stood as a decoration.

“At first, he wanted to keep it in our living room but I wouldn’t have it,” Zhu’s widow told Kentucky for Kentcuky.

“It scared me. I made him take it to the store.”

Zhu had no idea about the bear’s wild cocaine history, nor did his widow, who sold the bear to Kentucky for Kentucky’s owners when they tracked it down.

To this day, Cocaine Bear is on display at the Fun Mall in Lexington, Kentucky, as a tourist attraction.

Thornton came from a privileged background before serving as a paratrooper in the Dominican Republic.

He then joined the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Police Department in 1968, eventually becoming a member of its narcotics squad, while taking night classes to train as a lawyer.

A Drug Enforcement Administration who worked with Thornton on narcotics investigations in the 70s called him a “007 paramilitary type personality” and “an adventurer driven by adrenaline rushes” who eventually got bored with police work, the Washington Post reports.

The 40-year-old was carrying thousands in cash and two pistols, and was wearing night vision goggles, a bulletproof vest, and Gucci loafers on his feet.

Investigators later discovered he was in the final stages of a smuggling run when he jumped from a plane.

Flying from Colombia, Thornton was dropping packages of cocaine from the plane over Georgia – one of which the bear found.

He then jumped himself with the rest strapped to his waist – the abandoned aircraft was left on autopilot and it smashed into a mountainside in North Carolina.

According to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, Thornton “hit his head on the tail of the aircraft” as he jumped and failed to open his parachute as he plunged to the ground.

Cops thought he was planning to meet someone when he landed, and investigators retracing his plane’s flightpath eventually found nine duffel bags of cocaine.

But they were beaten to the tenth.

Three months after Thornton’s fall, the black bear that did find the tenth duffel bag was discovered dead in the forest.

The medical examiner gave the carcass to a taxidermist friend who stuffed the bear, and it went on display at a visitor centre in the forest.

When a wildfire swept through the forest in the 90s, employees at the centre saved the bear and some of their other treasures from the flames by putting them in storage.

But it was stolen and sold to a pawn shop – which in turn sold it to country music legend Waylon Jennings.

He gave it to a friend and, when the friend died, it was bought for $200 at an auction of his estate.

The buyer, Zhu T’ang, ran a Chinese medicine shop in Reno, Nevada, where the bear stood as a decoration.

“At first, he wanted to keep it in our living room but I wouldn’t have it,” Zhu’s widow told Kentucky for Kentcuky.

“It scared me. I made him take it to the store.”

Zhu had no idea about the bear’s wild cocaine history, nor did his widow, who sold the bear to Kentucky for Kentucky’s owners when they tracked it down.

To this day, Cocaine Bear is on display at the Fun Mall in Lexington, Kentucky, as a tourist attraction.

Thornton came from a privileged background before serving as a paratrooper in the Dominican Republic.

He then joined the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Police Department in 1968, eventually becoming a member of its narcotics squad, while taking night classes to train as a lawyer.

A Drug Enforcement Administration who worked with Thornton on narcotics investigations in the 70s called him a “007 paramilitary type personality” and “an adventurer driven by adrenaline rushes” who eventually got bored with police work, the Washington Post reports.

But the rounds didn’t penetrate the bulletproof vest he was wearing and cops concluded the shooting was staged to persuade the judge his life would be in danger if he was jailed.

He was sentenced to six months for the cannabis conspiracy – but it didn’t deter him from his drug dealing operations which ultimately led to his death.

Universal Pictures

The insane film shows a bear eatings packets of coke that fell from the sky[/caption]

Cocaine Bear was stuffed and is now on display as a tourist attraction in Kentucky
The Cocaine Bear is now on display in Kentucky